Browsing: The Jungle

The jungle

Tambopata 0

peru
Squirrel monkey. All photos by author. 

By David Dudenhoefer

Ox-bow lakes crowded by exuberant foliage, multicolored macaws squawking in the treetops, squirrel monkeys skittering along branches – the Tambopata National Reserve, in the Madre de Dios region, brims with such varied and abundant wildlife that it’s easy to forget how many of its species are threatened. Yet the region’s spectacular biodiversity faces pressure from mining, hunting, deforestation and even poorly managed tourism.

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Rafting the Amazon River. From left, Nathan, Adam, Andreas and Isis.
 

Nathan Paluck
LivinginPeru.com

Last year, three friends and I built a wooden raft and paddled 200 kilometers down the Amazon River in Peru. The Amazon River Raft Race. The only one of its kind in the world. It was one of the funnest things I’ve ever done. It was also, at times, similar to mild torture.

Adam, Andreas, Isis and I took off at the start of the Amazon River in the small town of Nauta with 40 other teams. Three days and 20 hours of raft time later, we arrived to the finish line in Iquitos, Peru’s largest jungle city. We were exhausted but happy.

Junin 0

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Only the Pan-Himalayan line in Tibet beats this 4,000-plus meters above sea level experience.

By Susana Aguirre

I remember one morning at a Starbucks in Hyde Park, Chicago a couple years back, I met a nice man sipping coffee and reading a newspaper who said he was Lara Flynn Boyle’s uncle. I was sitting at the table next to him studying for finals, so the distraction was all the more welcomed. After a few minutes of chit chat he found out I was Peruvian and began to tell me about his youthful adventures.

Tambopata 0

peru
An ecolodge in Tambopata

By Iñigo Maneiro/El Comercio
Translated by Susana Aguirre

Nearby Puerto Maldonado you’ll find several initiatives that have recovered parts of the Amazon jungle to offer them as travel experiences.

Iquitos-Amazon 0

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Views of the jungle from the Ivy Mara Ey Lodge (Photo: FONDAM)

By Fiorella Carrera/El Comercio
Translated by Susana Aguirre

Juan Gil, Executive Director of the Fund for the Americas of Peru (FONDAM) talks about financing the Ivy Mara Ey Lodge, part of the Yarina project in Pacaya Samiria and first lodge with this type of certification in sustainable tourism.

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Achiles Amasifuen, right, is the man to call for a adventurous tour of Peru’s Amazon forest. All photos courtesy of Matthew Barker, shown on the left.

By Matthew Barker

As Peru continues its slow but steady transition from a low budget backpacker’s paradise towards the world of tour packages and luxury hotels, options for escaping the Gringo Trail into the Amazonian wilderness are fast diminishing.

Most visitors these days opt for a stay in one of the countless lodges in the tamed and controlled jungle surrounding Iquitos in the north and Puerto Maldonado to the south. The Manu reserve is still a genuine wilderness, but one that sees increasing numbers of travelers each year.

Amazon 0

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A traveler catches a Peacock Bass on Peru’s Amazon River. (All photos courtesy of Ciro Moron)

By Douglass G. Norvell

“Good things just seem to happen by accident,” says Ciro Moron, formerly a full time mototaxista but now known as the Amazon Fish Eagle. “One day the Hotel Acosta called me to take this professor for a City Tour, and five years later, I am working almost all the time as a fishing guide.”

In the Amazon Basin there are two distinct markets for guide services. One is to take out aficionados, or very serious anglers who come from other countries to fish for Peacock Bass and other exotic species in a once-in-a-lifetime experience. These anglers bring tons of equipment and expect to pay hundreds of dollars a day, and travel deep into the rainforest in search of virgin fishing grounds.

Ciro, however, focusses on giving the Amazon fishing trips for the recreational anglers.

Tambopata 0

Cruising a river in Peru’s Amazon. (Photos by Andreas Vailakis) See slide show.


By Sonia Kandathil

There are times when mothers have HAD-IT-UP-TO-HERE with screaming children, with dinners where half the food ends up on the floor, and with terrible twos tantrums that seem to occur out of the blue at the most inconvenient times and places (example: Jockey plaza when we said “no” to a balloon). So just when I was about to throw in the towel and go on a two day strike, Peruvian style, I received an invitation from Rainforest Expeditions http://www.perunature.com/ to review their 5 Day, 4 night trip to the Tambopata Nature Reserve in Puerto Maldonado sans children.

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