Cuzco Plans Strike to Demand Results for Long Awaited International Airport

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Schools closed and public transportation suspended as protests are planned to march in hopes of pressuring the government’s decision after political battling stalls project.

In the coming days, Cuzco is set to have a state-wide strike to protest the setbacks of the Chinchero contract caused by political disagreements between Congress and the incumbent administration that have left the project looking further away from completion than ever, La Republica reports.

The protesters and citizens of Cuzco are asking the government to define a plan that would complete the long-promised international airport for Cuzco, a project that would change the dynamic of tourism in the region and in the entire country as foreign tourists would no longer need to first fly to the capital of Lima if their primary destination is Cuzco.

Local municipalities appear to be taking the strike seriously as well, as schools have been officially canceled and public transport suspended to ensure the safety of students and citizens during the protests. One of the organizations behind the strike has given the government until June 12, approx. 2 weeks, to attend to the issue if they do not want to face an indefinite strike in the region.

We covered some of the details of the contract last week, and although there were some unfavorable conditions arranged under the previous president, Ollanta Humala, the current administration had decided to move forward because of the further costs and possible legal battles involved in arranging a new deal. However, Congress would not accept the deal under any circumstances and had threatened to vote Martí­n Vizcarra, Minister of Transport, out of office if he did not resign. Following these events, he resigned and annulled the contract while and the project was left in an uncertain limbo.

The latest that we have heard from the government on the issue is that the alternative of converting the Chinchero airport into a publicly funded project has been evaluated and the majority on the counsel appear to be in favor. This would reduce issues of lobbying or favoritism of any corporations in the process, and Vice President Martí­n Vizcarra has assured that this is a very particular case and should not scare investors away from Peru.

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Mike Dreckschmidt

Mike grew up and eventually attended university in Green Bay, Wisconsin. He graduated in Integrative Leadership Studies with an emphasis in Urban and Regional Planning and has been a part of planning projects in three different countries. Mike’s passion is reading; he devours both literature and nonfiction. His favorite author is Peru’s own Julio Ramón Ribeyro.

Cuzco Plans Strike to Demand Results for Long Awaited International Airport

0

Schools closed and public transportation suspended as protests are planned to march in hopes of pressuring the government’s decision after political battling stalls project.

In the coming days, Cuzco is set to have a state-wide strike to protest the setbacks of the Chinchero contract caused by political disagreements between Congress and the incumbent administration that have left the project looking further away from completion than ever, La Republica reports.

The protesters and citizens of Cuzco are asking the government to define a plan that would complete the long-promised international airport for Cuzco, a project that would change the dynamic of tourism in the region and in the entire country as foreign tourists would no longer need to first fly to the capital of Lima if their primary destination is Cuzco.

Local municipalities appear to be taking the strike seriously as well, as schools have been officially canceled and public transport suspended to ensure the safety of students and citizens during the protests. One of the organizations behind the strike has given the government until June 12, approx. 2 weeks, to attend to the issue if they do not want to face an indefinite strike in the region.

We covered some of the details of the contract last week, and although there were some unfavorable conditions arranged under the previous president, Ollanta Humala, the current administration had decided to move forward because of the further costs and possible legal battles involved in arranging a new deal. However, Congress would not accept the deal under any circumstances and had threatened to vote Martí

Comments

comments

Mike Dreckschmidt

Mike grew up and eventually attended university in Green Bay, Wisconsin. He graduated in Integrative Leadership Studies with an emphasis in Urban and Regional Planning and has been a part of planning projects in three different countries. Mike’s passion is reading; he devours both literature and nonfiction. His favorite author is Peru’s own Julio Ramón Ribeyro.